Personnel

Katherine Rogers headshot.

Katherine W. Rogers, Ph.D.

Lead Investigator, Unit on Developmental Signaling
Phone: 301-480-2203
Email: katherine.rogers@nih.gov

Katherine obtained a B.S. in Molecular Biology from the University of Wyoming, where she used C. elegans to study developmental genetics in Dr. David S. Fay’s lab. She then joined Alexander F. Schier’s lab at Harvard University for her Ph.D. work focusing on the role of the Nodal/Lefty activator/inhibitor system in germ layer patterning. For her postdoctoral research she joined Patrick Müller’s group at the Friedrich Miescher Laboratory of the Max Planck Society, where she examined signaling molecule movement and signaling interpretation in zebrafish embryos.  

William Anderson headshot.

William K. Anderson, B.S.

Research Specialist, Unit on Developmental Signaling
Phone: 301-873-2942
Email: william.anderson4@nih.gov

Will obtained a B.S. in Marine Biology and in Aquaculture from the Florida Institute of Technology, where he studied fish and invertebrate biology and aquaculture. He then went on to work at NIH’s Shared Zebrafish Facility, where he performed husbandry, health management, and evaluative projects for the zebrafish colony there.

Catherine Rogers headshot.

Catherine E. Rogers, B.S.

Post-baccalaureate Fellow, Unit on Developmental Signaling
Email: catherine.rogers@nih.gov

Catherine obtained a B.S. in Bioengineering at Stanford University where she studied gene expression in three different animal models. She studied goblet cell gene expression in innate immunity and planarian gut regeneration with Dania Nanes Sarfati in Bo Wang’s lab at Stanford University. She juxtaposed single cell transcriptomes in anteriorly patterned larva and adult Schizocardium californicum with Paul Bump in Christopher Lowe’s lab at the Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University. And, she examined heterochromatin 3-D organization and genome integrity in mouse demethylated pluripotent embryonic stem cells with Pierre Therizols in Emmanuelle Fabre’s and Pascale Lesage’s lab at INSERM, Paris, France. 

Allison Saul headshot.

Allison J. Saul, B.S.

Post-baccalaureate Fellow, Unit on Developmental Signaling
Email: allison.saul@nih.gov

Allison obtained a B.S. in Molecular and Microbiology from the University of Wyoming, where she studied developmental genetics using C. elegans in Dr. David S. Fay’s lab. Using the sibling subtraction method as described in Joseph et al. 2018, she identified causal mutations that suppressed nekl-2;nekl-3 double mutants under the supervision of Phil Edeen. 

Daria Lukasz headshot.

Daria Lukasz, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral fellow, Unit on Developmental Signaling
Email: daria.lukasz@nih.gov

Daria obtained a B.A. in the Biological Basis of Behavior from the University of Pennsylvania. She then joined Katie Kindt’s group at the NIDCD for her PhD work in the Johns Hopkins University-NIH Graduate Partnerships Program to study how chronic sensory hair-cell neurotransmission modulates susceptibility to ototoxins.

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