Are there any special conditions or situations in which I should not breastfeed?

In special cases, women may be advised not to breastfeed. These instances include when a woman is taking certain medications or drugs, when she has been diagnosed with a specific illness, or when other specific conditions apply.

Citations

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2015). Breastfeeding: Diseases and conditions. Retrieved March 21, 2016, from http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/disease/index.htm
  2. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2016). Breastfeeding your baby. Retrieved June 1, 2016, from http://www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/Breastfeeding-Your-Baby 
  3. Tepper, D. (2015). Pregnancy and lactation—migraine management. Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain, 55, 607–608. Retrieved January 28, 2016, from https://americanheadachesociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Pregnancy_and_Lactation_Toolbox.pdf  (PDF 209 KB)
  4. Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Women's Mental Health. (2015). Breastfeeding & psychiatric medications. Retrieved January 29, 2016, from http://www.womensmentalhealth.org/specialty-clinics/breastfeeding-and-psychiatric-medication/ 
  5. March of Dimes. (2016). Keeping breast milk safe and healthy. Retrieved June 2, 2016, from http://www.marchofdimes.org/baby/keeping-breast-milk-safe-and-healthy.aspx 
  6. CDC. (2009, October 23). 2009 H1N1 (swine flu) and feeding your baby: What parents should know. Retrieved April 27, 2012, from http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/infantfeeding.htm
  7. Dupont-Rouzeyrol, M., Biron, A., O'Connor, O., Huguon, E., & Descloux, E. (2016). Infectious Zika viral particles in breastmilk. Lancet, 387(10023), 1051.
  8. American Academy of Pediatrics. (2012). Breastfeeding and the use of human milk. Pediatrics, 129(3), e827–e841. Retrieved March 11, 2016 from http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e827 
  9. World Health Organization (WHO). (2008). HIV transmission through breastfeeding: A review of the available evidence. Retrieved March 11, 2016, from http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2008/9789241596596_eng.pdf  (PDF - 835 KB)
  10. WHO. (2010). Guidelines on HIV and infant feeding. Retrieved March 11, 2016, from http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2010/9789241599535_eng.pdf  (PDF - 1.58 MB)
  11. Coovadia, H. M., Rollins, N. C., Bland, R. M., Little, K., Coutsoudis, A., Bennish, M. L., & Newell, M.-L. (2007). Mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 infection during exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months of life: An intervention cohort study. Lancet, 369(9567), 1107–1116. Retrieved March 11, 2016, from http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140673607602839/fulltext 
  12. American Diabetes Association. (2007). Nutrition recommendations and interventions for diabetes. A position statement of the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care, 30(Suppl 1), S48–S65. Retrieved January 29, 2016, from http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/30/suppl_1/S48.full 
  13. BFAR. (2009). General frequently asked questions (FAQ) about breastfeeding after breast and nipple surgeries. Retrieved January 29, 2016, from http://www.bfar.org/faq.shtml 
  14. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2015). Substance use while pregnant and breastfeeding. Retrieved January 29, 2016, from http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/substance-use-in-women/substance-use-while-pregnant-breastfeeding

What are the benefits of breastfeeding?

What are the recommendations for breastfeeding?

How do I breastfeed?

What is weaning and how do I do it?

When breastfeeding, how many calories should moms and babies consume?

Are there any special conditions or situations in which I should not breastfeed?

How do I pump and store breast milk?

Do breastfed infants need other nutrition?

top of pageBACK TO TOP