Personnel

Ryan Dale, Ph.D.

Bldg 10 Rm 10D39, ryan.dale@nih.gov

After a Masters in Oceanography and a Ph.D. in Marine Biology from the University of Delaware, Ryan came to NIH in 2009 as the bioinformatician for a group of six PIs and about 40 post-docs in NIDDK (Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental Biology, LCDB). From 2009-2018, he became a developmental biologist, analyzed thousands of high-throughput sequencing libraries across hundreds of experiments, and led the bioinformatics on most papers published by the group. During that time he developed open-source software packages in Python, R, and C (some of which have been downloaded tens of thousands of times), contributed to many other open source software packages, co-founded the Bioconda  project, and led workshops teaching computational skills to biologists. He starting in 2018 as Scientific Information Officer at NICHD, and looks forward to leading the Bioinformatics and Scientific Programming Core and growing the total bioinformatics capacity of the institute through collaborations and training.

Caroline Esnault, Ph.D.

Bldg 10 Rm 10D39, caroline.esnault@nih.gov

While completing her PhD in Molecular Genetics at the University of Lyon, France, Caroline taught Statistics, Evolution and Population Genetics. Her thesis and postdoctoral work focused on understanding the impact of transposable elements on the genome of a variety of organisms. She joined NICHD in 2011 as a postdoctoral fellow in the group of Henry Levin, where she managed the lab’s high-throughput sequencer, in addition to consulting for her teammates on statistics and sequence analyses. She became fascinated with Next Generation Sequencing and learned programming in Python, Perl and R to develop or optimize the bioinformatics tools she needed. She joined the BSPC in 2018 and aims to provide the NICHD bioinformatics core with expertise at the interface of biology and computer science.

Apratim Mitra, Ph.D.

Bldg 10 Rm 10D39, apratim.mitra@nih.gov

Apratim completed his Ph.D. in computational biology from the University of Maryland, College Park before joining NICHD in 2013 as a post-doctoral fellow in the lab of Karl Pfeifer. There, he worked on understanding the functions of a conserved long non-coding RNA while being closely involved in the planning and analysis of several other projects both in his lab and with collaborators in the Division of Developmental biology (DDB). As a result, he learned concepts of developmental biology and contributed to several projects in diverse contexts and co-authored multiple scientific articles. Apratim enjoys the challenge of multi-disciplinary science and has extensive experience in many aspects of bioinformatics and statistical analysis. He is looking forward to contributing to the development of a strong bioinformatics community and support network to enable exciting new science in the institute.

Eric Chang, B.S.

Bldg 10 Rm 10D39, eric.chang@nih.gov

Eric grew up in Atlanta, GA and received his B.S. in Biology from the University of Richmond in 2018. After three years there of wet-lab experience studying drug-induced contractions of sponges, he found he had a knack for statistical analyses, programming and visualization. He joined BSPC in 2018, and enjoys finding patterns and associations in whatever he comes across -- whether it is biological data or soccer statistics -- and in supporting those claims with careful analysis.

Sydney Hertafeld, B.S.

Bldg 10 Rm 10D39, sydney.hertafeld@nih.gov

Originally from Lansing, Michigan, Sydney graduated from Cornell University in 2018 with a B.S. in Biology. She got her first taste of bioinformatics during her undergrad research, using variant calling programs to study canine lymphoma. Eager to learn more, she took a Python class her senior year and loved it, wishing she could go back in time to take more programming classes. She joined the NICHD BSPC as a postbac in August of 2018 and is overjoyed to have found a position that combines her lifelong interest in biology with her newfound interest in computer science.