Current Lab Members


Philip Adams

Philip joined the group from the University of Central Florida where he identified and characterized novel RNAs in Borrelia burgdorferi during his thesis work with Prof. Mollie Jewett. He continues to be interested small RNAs and their roles in stress responses in both E. coli and B. burgdorferi.

NIH, Building 49, Room 1A-35
49 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-4417
Telephone: 301-402-0532
FAX: 301-480-0975
Email: philip.adams@nih.gov

Jordan Aoyama

Jordan was a Research Associate at a number of companies before joining the lab as a graduate student in the Molecular Biology Ph.D. program of the University of Maryland. Jordan is determining how the mRNA and small RNA activities of dual-function RNAs impact each other.

NIH, Building 49, Room 1A-35
49 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-4417
Telephone: 301-496-6811
FAX: 301-480-0975
Email: Jordan.aoyama@nih.gov

Andrew (Andy) Kouse

Andy has an extensive background in bacterial regulatory RNAs having carried out studies of RNA thermometers in Shigella dysenteriae for his thesis work with Prof. Erin Murphy at Ohio University. He is now studying the physiological role of a small RNA regulator at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism as well as small RNA evolution in enteric bacteria.

NIH, Building 49, Room 1A-35
49 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-4417
Telephone:  301-496-4779
FAX:  301-480-0975
Email: andy.kouse@nih.gov

Sahar Melamed

Sahar carried out graduate work developing microbial sensors for the detection of toxicants and antibiotic compounds with Prof. Shimshon Belkin at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. During a short postdoctoral stay in the lab of Prof. Hanah Margalit, he developed the remarkable RIL-seq approach for the transcriptome-wide identification of mRNA targets of Hfq-binding small RNAs. He is following up this work with the characterization of four σ28-regulated small RNAs and ProQ-binding RNAs.  

NIH, Building 49, Room 1A-35
49 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-4417
Telephone: 301-402-0531
FAX: 301-480-0975
Email: sahar.melamed@nih.gov

Mona Wu Orr

Mona made the exciting discovery of an enzyme which cleaves the pGpG form of the signaling molecule c-di-GMP as a graduate student with Prof. Vincent Lee at the University of Maryland. She has now turned her focus toward understanding the interactions between small proteins and transporters in the inner membrane.

NIH, Building 49, Room 1A-35
49 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-4417
Telephone: 301-496-4581
FAX: 301-480-0975
Email: mona.orr@nih.gov

Medha Raina

Medha took on the long-standing project of characterizing the dual-function IsrB RNA encoding the 28-amino acid amphipathic AzuC protein after studying tRNA synthetases and mistranslation as a graduate student with Prof. Michael Ibba at The Ohio State University.

NIH, Building 49, Room 1A-35
49 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-4417
Telephone: 301-496-4783
FAX: 301-480-0975
Email: medha.raina@nih.gov

Franchesca Uribe-Rheinbolt

Franchesca obtained a B.S. in Chemistry from Appalachian State University. She has initiated a project to purify homologs of AcrB transporters to identify associated small proteins, where her love of optimizing protocols is paying off.

NIH, Building 49, Room 1A-35
49 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-4417
Telephone: 301-402-5856
FAX: 301-480-0975
Email: franchesca.uribe-rheinbolt@nih.gov

Lauren Walling

Lauren studied protein-protein interactions and RNA target specificity of toxin-antitoxin systems as a graduate student in Prof. J. Scott Butler’s group at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She is collaborating with Andy Kouse and the groups of Dr. Kai Papenfort and Dr. Konrad Förstner to examine small RNA evolution in enteric bacteria.

NIH, Building 49, Room 1A-35
49 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-4417
Telephone: 301-451-3296
FAX: 301-480-0975
Email: lauren.walling@nih.gov

Jeremy Weaver

As a graduate student with Prof. Hays Rye at Texas A&M University, Jeremy studied the interaction between the GroEL chaperone and misfolded proteins. This background in protein biochemistry will be valuable in his project of developing biochemical assays to detect and identify small proteins.

NIH, Building 49, Room 1A-35
49 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-4417
Telephone: 301-496-4722
FAX: 301-480-0975
Email: jeremy.weaver2@nih.gov

Aixia Zhang

Aixia has worked on nearly every aspect of small RNA identification and characterization; assisting many projects in the Storz lab as well as in other labs. Currently, she is collaborating with Philip and Sahar to characterize the ProQ-dependent RNA-RNA interactome. Contact Aixia for questions about protocols! 

NIH, Building 49, Room 1A-35
49 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-4417
Telephone: 301-402-0967
FAX: 301-480-0975
Email: zhanga@mail.nih.gov

top of pageBACK TO TOP