Skip Navigation

Video Text Alternative: Lifelong Learning Reading

Skip sharing on social media links

To view the original video, please go to http://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/early-learning/topicinfo/Pages/promote.aspx

Video/GraphicsAudio
TITLE SLIDE:

Developing Lifelong Learners: Reading Skills

Animation of a young mother sitting outside with her daughter on her lap. The mother holds an open book while the daughter turns the pages.

Logo of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Logo of the NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Instrumental music plays in the background.
Camera view of Dr. Brett Miller.

Banner text: Brett Miller, Ph.D.
Child Development and Behavior Branch
Brett Miller: If you’re a parent and want to develop lifelong learners in your children, I think there’s a range of things that you can do.
GRAPHICS SLIDE:

Animation of a young mother sitting on a couch with her daughter on her lap. The mother holds an open book while the little girl looks at the pages. A speech bubble appears above the little girl with the text “Does her wish come true?” Then a speech bubble appears above the mother with the text “Turn the page, and we’ll see.” The little girl turns the page.
Dr. Miller: You can read books to children every day. You’re giving them not only experience to the content of what’s in the book in terms of the story, the vocabulary, the sorts of background knowledge that you build through reading.
GRAPHICS SLIDE CONTINUED:

Animation of a book opening to show two blank pages. A castle on a hillside with the sun in the background appears on the left-hand page. Lines of text appear on the right-hand page. A person’s hand turns the page. The text “THE END!” is on the new left-hand page and a picture of the woman and her daughter is on the right-hand page.
Dr. Miller: But it also gives them an understanding of the structure in the text, the flow of reading from left to right in English, flipping of a page to get you to the next content.
GRAPHICS SLIDE CONTINUED:

Animation of the woman and her daughter sitting on the couch discussing the book. A speech bubble appears above the mother with the text “Where does the princess live?” A thought bubble appears above the little girl with an image of the castle from the book in the previous animation. Another speech bubble appears next to the mother with the text “What wakes her every morning?” A thought bubble appears next to the little girl with an image of the sun.
Dr. Miller: You can ask children questions to try to encourage them to think about what’s going to happen next—what we talk about as “W-H” questions in English: who, what, when, where, why?
GRAPHICS SLIDE CONTINUED:

Animation of a table with an open cookbook on it, along with butter, flour, eggs, oranges, a pie pan and a bowl of apples. On the wall in the background hang three pictures. The picture on the left has the word “Eggplant” above an image of an eggplant. The picture on the right has the word “Apples” above an image of two red apples. The picture in the middle has the word “Oranges” above an image of three oranges. The woman and her daughter pop up behind the table and point to the pages of the cookbook. A speech bubble appears above the little girl with the text “How many apples fit inside a pie?” A speech bubble appears above the mother with the text “Let’s find out. Read the recipe to me.”
Dr. Miller: Also creating an environment where they see role models that are involved in these sort of lifelong processes of learning. Do whatever activities are going to be fun for you to engage with your children.
GRAPHICS SLIDE:

Video fades to text:

Logo of the NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

For more information, visit www.nichd.nih.gov
Instrumental music plays in the background.
FADE TO BLACK SCREEN 
BOND National Institues of Health Home Home Division of Intramural Population Health Research