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Three condoms, with birth control pills and other forms of contraception in the background.

What are the different types of contraception?

There are many different types of contraception, but not all types are appropriate for all situations. The most appropriate method of birth control depends on an individual's overall health, age, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners, desire to have children in the future, and family history of certain diseases.

  • Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC)

  • Hormonal Methods

  • Barrier Methods

  • Emergency Contraception

  • Sterilization

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Citations

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  1. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. (2012). Birth control methods fact sheet. Retrieved September 8, 2016, from http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/birth-control-methods.html [top]
  2. Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc. (2014). Birth control. Retrieved February 23, 2016, from http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-topics/birth-control-4211.htm External Web Site Policy [top]
  3. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2015). Birth control: Medicines to help you. Retrieved February 17, 2016, from http://www.fda.gov/forconsumers/byaudience/forwomen/freepublications/ucm313215.htm [top]
  4. Williams, D. D. (2015). IUD, implant contraception effective beyond FDA-approved use​. Retrieved June 20, 2016, from https://source.wustl.edu/2015/02/iud-implant-contraception-effective-beyond-fdaapproved-use [top]
  5. National Center for Biotechnology Information. (2010). Medroxyprogesterone injection. Retrieved February 23, 2016, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0011058/ [top]
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2013). U.S. Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, 2013: Adapted from the World Health Organization Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, 2nd Edition. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 62(RR05), 1–46. Retrieved September 12, 2016, from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6205a1.htm[top]
  7. Trussell, J. (2011). Contraceptive failure in the United States. Contraception, 83(5), 397–404. Retrieved September 12, 2016, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21477680 [top]
  8. Mayer Laboratories, Inc. (2012). Product details. Retrieved June 4, 2012, from http://www.todaysponge.com/about.html External Web Site Policy [top]
  9. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2014). Barrier methods of contraception. Retrieved February 23, 2016, from https://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq022.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20120604T212254575 External Web Site Policy (PDF - 86 KB) [top]
  10. Allen, R. E. (2004). Diaphragm fitting. American Family Physician, 69(1), 97–100. [top]
  11. Conceptus. (2012). What is Essure? Retrieved February 23, 2016, from http://www.essure.com/what-is-essure External Web Site Policy [top]
  12. National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus. (2013). Tubal ligation. Retrieved February 23, 2016, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/tuballigation.html [top]
  13. National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus. (2016). Vasectomy. Retrieved February 23, 2016, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002995.htm [top]

What are the different types of contraception?

How effective is contraception?

Can contraception reduce the risk of getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD)?​​​​​​​​​​​​

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