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Video Text Alternative: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in Kids

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TITLE SLIDE:

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in Kids
Causes and Prevention Strategies

Logos: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

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GRAPHICS SLIDE:

Animation of the silhouette of a child’s head with a representation of the brain. As the animation progresses, it illustrates the brain being damaged in three different scenarios: a blow to the head, a jolt of the brain, or an object penetrating the skull.
Narrator:

Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, is an injury that disrupts the brain and its activity. TBI can result from a blow to the head, a jolt of the brain, or an object that goes through the skull.
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Map of the United States. Animated text: “In the United States each year, 1.7 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury.”
Narrator:

In the United States each year, 1.7 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury.
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Animation of 15 silhouettes of the heads of women, men, and children with representations of their brains.

Legend: “1 head = 20,000 people”

As the animation progresses, the brains disappear and the head silhouettes are used to illustrate the ratios from the voice-over: 1.5 heads change color to symbolize deaths resulting from TBI, and the remaining 12.5 heads display a symbol representing hospitalization.
Narrator:

Each of these heads represents 20,000 people. Of the 1.7 million injured, 50,000 people die and more than 250,000 are hospitalized.
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Animated text: “TBI can be mild [to] severe”

The text surrounds an animated image resembling a fuel gauge or a pressure gauge. As the animation progresses, the needle in the gauge slowly goes from mild to severe. The needle wavers at the severe end of the scale as though exceeding capacity.
Narrator:

TBI can be mild to severe. Severe TBI can lead to permanent disability and even death.
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Animation of a pie chart divided into two sections: a 75-percent section, labeled “mild,” and a 25-percent section.
Narrator:

Seventy-five percent of injuries are mild, meaning they are not life-threatening.
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Animation demonstrating four common types of TBIs:
  • A silhouette representing a child falling, accompanied by the word “falls” and the figure “55%”
  • A silhouette representing a child who is hit with a ball, accompanied by the words “unintentional blunt trauma” and the figure “24%”
  • A silhouette representing a car crash, accompanied by the words “motor vehicle crashes”
  • A silhouette of a seated child, accompanied by the word “assault”
Narrator:

In the U.S., most brain injuries in children, 55 percent, are caused by falls; 24 percent are caused by being hit in the head with an object, like a soccer ball.

Among children older than 5, car accidents are the number one cause of TBI-related death. Assault is the number one cause of TBI-related death in those younger than 5.
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Animated text: “All types of TBI can seriously affect a child’s daily life.”

Animation demonstrating four impairments that can occur as a result of TBI:
  • A silhouette of a child’s head with talk bubbles, representing impaired speaking or understanding
  • A silhouette of a child’s head with two arrows, representing impaired movement
  • A silhouette of a child’s head with two gears, representing impaired thinking or memory
  • A silhouette of a child’s head with two “face” icons—one smiling and one frowning—representing impaired personality or mood
Narrator:

But even mild brain injury, like a concussion, can seriously affect daily activities.

Mild TBI can cause problems with a child’s speaking or understanding, movement, thinking or memory, and personality or mood.
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Animated text: “Take the following actions to reduce the risk of TBI in children.”

Animation demonstrating four ways viewers can reduce the risk of TBI occurrence in children:
  • A silhouette of a child wearing a seatbelt
  • A silhouette of a child on a bicycle wearing a helmet
  • A silhouette of a baby crawling next to a safety gate
  • A silhouette of a parent hugging a baby, representing a parent who does not shake or jolt a baby
Narrator:

We can all help reduce the risk of TBI in children. Use a safety seat and/or a seatbelt when the child is in a motor vehicle.

Make sure the child wears a helmet when riding a bicycle, skateboarding, and playing sports like hockey and football.

Install window guards and stair safety gates at home. Avoid shaking or jolting a baby.
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Video fades to text:

Logo: NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

For more information, visit http://www.nichd.nih.gov
Narrator:

To learn more, visit: nichd.nih.gov.
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Sources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014)
Get the Stats on Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014)
Injury Prevention and Control: Traumatic Brain Injury
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BOND National Institues of Health Home Home Division of Intramural Population Health Research