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Infographic: Pregnancy Myths

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Infographic: Pregnancy Myths

Pregnancy Myths: Get the Facts

Myth: "I'm eating for two."

Fact: Pregnant women need only about 300 extra calories per day. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy increases the risk for short-and long-term health problems for both mom and baby. Learn more about weight gain and pregnancy: http://go.usa.gov/85aQ.

Myth: "I can have an occasional drink during pregnancy without harming my baby."

Fact: There is no known "safe" level of alcohol intake for pregnant women. Even less than one drink per week can lead to serious birth defects. Drinking alcohol also increases the risk for learning and growth problems and for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Avoiding alcohol altogether is the best way to keep baby safe.

Myth: "I can't take any medications while I'm pregnant."

Fact: Many medications can be used during pregnancy, so it's often unnecessary to eliminate them completely. But some medications and nutritional supplements should be avoided during pregnancy. Find out what's ok and what to avoid: http://go.usa.gov/8ZRd.

Myth: "I shouldn't get a flu shot while I'm pregnant."

Fact: Actually, a flu shot is more important for pregnant women than for non-pregnant women.  The flu can cause severe illness and pregnancy problems for mom and can increase the risk of potentially serious health problems for baby.  Getting a flu shot (but not the nasal spray flu vaccine) during pregnancy is a safe and effective way to protect yourself and your baby.

Myth: “Pregnancy is 9 months, so babies can be born anytime after 36 weeks of pregnancy.” 

Fact: A healthy pregnancy usually lasts about 40 weeks, close to 10 months. Research shows that babies born at or after 39 weeks of pregnancy are, on average, healthier than babies born at 37 or 38 weeks. If medically safe, it's best to wait until at least 39 weeks to deliver. Learn more at http://go.usa.gov/85C5.

All pregnancies are different.

If you have questions about how any of the facts provided in this infographic may affect you, please talk to your health care provider.

References

Pregnancy Fact and Pregnancy Myth

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Last Updated Date: 08/05/2014
Last Reviewed Date: 08/05/2014
Vision National Institutes of Health Home BOND National Institues of Health Home Home Storz Lab: Section on Environmental Gene Regulation Home Machner Lab: Unit on Microbial Pathogenesis Home Division of Intramural Population Health Research Home Bonifacino Lab: Section on Intracellular Protein Trafficking Home Lilly Lab: Section on Gamete Development Home Lippincott-Schwartz Lab: Section on Organelle Biology