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Who is at risk of amenorrhea?

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According to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, amenorrhea that is not caused by pregnancy, breastfeeding, or menopause occurs in 3% to 4% of women during their lifetime.1 Secondary amenorrhea is more common than primary amenorrhea.

The risk factors for amenorrhea include:2

  • Excessive exercise
  • Obesity
  • Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa
  • A family history of amenorrhea or early menopause
  • Having a certain version of the FMR1 gene, that also causes fragile X syndrome3

  1. Practice Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (PC-ASRM). (2008). Current evaluation of amenorrhea. Fertility and Sterility, 90, S219−225. Retrieved April 6, 2012, from http://www.asrm.org/uploadedFiles/ASRM_Content/News_and_Publications/Practice_Guidelines/Educational_Bulletins/Current_evaluation(1).pdf External Web Site Policy (PDF - 146 KB) [top]
  2. Master-Hunter, T., & Heiman, D. L. (2006). Amenorrhea: Evaluation and treatment. American Family Physician. 73, 1374−1382. Retrieved April 6, 2012, from http://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0415/p1374.html External Web Site Policy [top]
  3. PC_ASRM. (2008). Current evaluation of amenorrhea. Fertility and Sterility, 90, S219−225. Retrieved June 6, 2012, from http://www.asrm.org/uploadedFiles/ASRM_Content/News_and_Publications/Practice_Guidelines/Educational_Bulletins/Current_evaluation(1).pdf External Web Site Policy (PDF - 146 KB) [top]

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Last Updated Date: 06/02/2014
Last Reviewed Date: 03/03/2013
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