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Vacancy Announcement: NICHD Director
NIH is seeking exceptional candidates for the position of NICHD Director. The Director provides leadership to a complex organization that conducts and supports biomedical and behavioral research—nationally and internationally—disseminating and communicating the results to further the health of children, adults, families and communities, and people with physical and developmental disabilities.


HIV Transmission from Mother to Child: From Epidemic to Near Elimination
Children are most likely to get HIV from their mothers in one of three ways: in the womb, during birth, or from breastfeeding or breast milk. NICHD research has helped establish safe and effective ways to prevent this type of HIV transmission. Check out our infographic to learn more.


Anti-HIV drug for adults is safe, effective in children exposed to nevirapine in the womb
HIV-infected children exposed in the womb to nevirapine, a drug used to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission, can safely and effectively transition to efavirenz, a similar drug recommended for older children and adults, according to a study funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health.


Two doses of chickenpox vaccine confer long-term protection in children on anti-HIV therapy
Children infected with HIV since birth benefit from two doses of the chickenpox vaccine, particularly when the first dose is given at least three months after the initiation of anti-HIV treatment, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).


Church programs increase HIV testing, treatment in rural Nigeria, NIH study finds
In an effort to boost HIV testing, as well as the use of anti-HIV therapy among pregnant women in rural villages, researchers supported in part by NICHD assessed the effectiveness of a church-based screening program in Southern Nigeria.


Drug used to treat HIV linked to lower bone mass in newborns
Infants exposed in the womb to a drug used to treat HIV and reduce the transmission of HIV from mother to child, may have lower bone mineral content than those exposed to other anti-HIV drugs, according to a National Institutes of Health study.


NICHD Launches New Data Sharing Resource to Accelerate Scientific Findings, Improve Health
NICHD recently launched the NICHD Data and Specimen Hub (DASH), a centralized resource for researchers to store and access de-identified data from NICHD-funded research studies for secondary research use.


Large percentage of youth with HIV may lack immunity to measles, mumps, rubella
Between one-third and one-half of individuals in the United States who were infected with HIV around the time of birth may not have sufficient immunity to ward off measles, mumps, and rubella—even though they may have been vaccinated against these diseases. This estimate, from a National Institutes of Health research network, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is based on a study of more than 600 children and youth exposed to HIV in the womb.


Exploring Population Dynamics
NICHD’s Population Dynamics Branch supports research on a range of topics, including the factors that make populations rise and fall, such as fertility and mortality. We checked in with branch chief Rebecca Clark to learn more about the branch’s work.


NIH launches new Spanish-language site for child health and human development
The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has launched a Spanish-language website that provides free information on health topics, including maternal and infant care, obesity, HIV/AIDS, fertility/infertility, and pregnancy.


For most children with HIV and low immune cell count, cells rebound after treatment
​​Most children with HIV who have low levels of a key immune cell eventually recover levels of this cell after beginning treatment, according to a study by researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. ​


Anti-herpes drug may help control HIV, NIH study finds
Valacyclovir, a drug commonly used to control the virus that causes genital herpes, appears to reduce the levels of HIV in patients who do not have genital herpes, according to a study by researchers from the National Institutes of Health, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Emory University, Atlanta and Lima, Peru.


Research Round-up: Advances in Adolescent Health
NICHD studies adolescence with the goal of putting teens on the road to healthy adulthood.


Research Network Helps HIV-Infected Youth
The Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions fights the spread of HIV with research on treatment and prevention in adolescents and young adults in the United States.


Study Reaffirms Safety of Anti-HIV Drugs During Pregnancy
The antiretroviral drugs used to keep HIV at bay are an unqualified success at preventing the spread of the virus from mother to child. The drugs are not only essential for maintaining the health of a pregnant woman with HIV, they have also nearly eliminated the transmission of HIV to her baby. Among U.S. women, the likelihood of a mother passing the virus on to her child is now less than 1%.


NICHD Recognizes Successes in HIV/AIDS Research and Focuses on Continued Challenges and Opportunities
The NICHD’s Maternal and Pediatric Infectious Disease Branch is building on its successes in HIV/AIDS research with a greater commitment to research on HIV-associated co-infections and other infectious diseases. We talk with the new Branch chief about the Branch’s successes in HIV/AIDS research and its expanded research mission.


NIH-sponsored study identifies superior drug regimen for preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission
For HIV-infected women in good immune health, taking a three-drug regimen during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission more effectively than taking one drug during pregnancy, another during labor and two more after giving birth, an international clinical trial has found.


NICHD Helps Build Research Capacity in Africa
In an effort to strengthen research in sub-Saharan Africa, the NICHD supported the training of researchers and administrators from 32 African countries on aspects of good grantsmanship. The materials from the training—tutorials, videos, and slides—are now online.


"Mississippi Baby" Now Has Detectable HIV, Researchers Find
The child known as the “Mississippi baby”—an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall—now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case.


Podcast on Women’s Health: Where We’ve Been, Where We’re Going
Drs. Alan Guttmacher and Janine Clayton discuss past advances in women’s health research and possible future directions.
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For details and further information on select NICHD News Releases, please see Backgrounders.

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