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Hinkle, Stefanie

Formal Title:

Staff Scientist

Responsibilities:

Dr. Hinkle contributes to the study management and scientific work for the gestational diabetes (GDM) related research program in the Division of Intramural Population Health Research. Stefanie’s research focuses on the interplay of complex lifestyle factors on GDM and long-term metabolic health and the underlying molecular mechanisms.

Phone:

301-594-1261

Email:

hinklesn@mail.nih.gov

Address:

6710B ROCKLEDGE DRIVE Room 3137B, MSC 7004
Bethesda ,MD 20817

Organization:

Biosketch:

Stefanie Hinkle, Ph.D., is a staff scientist in the Epidemiology Branch of the Division of Intramural Population Health Research at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. She received her Ph.D. in Nutrition and Health Sciences from Emory University and completed her postdoctoral fellowship in Epidemiology at NICHD. Dr. Hinkle’s research focuses on the interplay of complex lifestyle factors on gestational diabetes and maternal and fetal health and the underlying molecular mechanisms.

Curriculum Vitae for Stefanie Hinkle in PDF (PDF - 137 KB)
Curriculum Vitae for Stefanie Hinkle in HTML

 

Featured Items:

"A new analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health has provided the strongest evidence to date that nausea and vomiting during pregnancy is associated with a lower risk of miscarriage in pregnant women. The study, appearing in JAMA Internal Medicine, was conducted by researchers at NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and other institutions."

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-links-morning-sickness-lower-risk-pregnancy-loss

 

"Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a two-way link between depression and gestational diabetes. Women who reported feeling depressed during the first two trimesters of pregnancy were nearly twice as likely to develop gestational diabetes, according to an analysis of pregnancy records. Conversely, a separate analysis found that women who developed gestational diabetes were more likely to report postpartum depression six weeks after giving birth, compared to a similar group of women who did not develop gestational diabetes."

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/depression-early-pregnancy-linked-gestational-diabetes-nih-study-finds

Publications (PubMed):

Excess gestational weight gain is associated with child adiposity among mothers with normal and overweight prepregnancy weight status.
Reliability of Gestational Weight Gain Reported Postpartum: A Comparison to the Birth Certificate.
Prepregnancy obesity trends among low-income women, United States, 1999-2008.
Gestational weight gain in obese mothers and associations with fetal growth.
Associations between maternal prepregnancy body mass index and child neurodevelopment at 2 years of age.
Validation of Self-Reported Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes at Six Weeks Postpartum.
Association of Nausea and Vomiting During Pregnancy With Pregnancy Loss: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial.
A longitudinal study of depression and gestational diabetes in pregnancy and the postpartum period.
Maternal Weight Gain During Pregnancy: Comparing Methods to Address Bias Due to Length of Gestation in Epidemiological Studies.
The association between parity and birthweight in a longitudinal consecutive pregnancy cohort.
Longitudinal changes in gestational weight gain and the association with intrauterine fetal growth.
Trajectories of maternal gestational weight gain and child cognition assessed at 5 years of age in a prospective cohort study.
It's About Time: A Survival Approach to Gestational Weight Gain and Preterm Delivery.
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