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Blood Levels of Key Metals Not Associated with Bone Density in Younger Women

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Exposure to metals has been associated with reduced bone mineral density in older populations, but it is unclear whether the same is true in women of reproductive age. 

Researchers in the in the Epidemiology Branch of the Division of Intramural Population Health Research measured blood levels of key metals (including mercury, cadmium, and lead) in nearly 250 healthy, pre-menopausal women age 18 to 44. 

Mercury was associated with reduced odds of decreased lumbar spine bone mineral density. However, overall, metals at environmentally relevant levels of exposure were not associated with reduced bone mineral density in this population of healthy, reproductive-aged women (PMID: 23122770). 

Last Updated Date: 06/18/2014
Last Reviewed Date: 06/18/2014
Vision National Institutes of Health Home BOND National Institues of Health Home Home Storz Lab: Section on Environmental Gene Regulation Home Machner Lab: Unit on Microbial Pathogenesis Home Division of Intramural Population Health Research Home Bonifacino Lab: Section on Intracellular Protein Trafficking Home Lilly Lab: Section on Gamete Development Home Lippincott-Schwartz Lab: Section on Organelle Biology