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Video Text Alternative: NIH Scientists Identify Maternal & Fetal Genes that Increase Preterm Birth Risk - English

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To view the original video and read the News Release, please go to http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/releases/Pages/021910-genes-increase-preterm-birth-risk.aspx

Video/Graphics Audio

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DHHS and NIH Logos

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Eunice Kennedy Shriver NICHD Logo

 

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Interview with:

Roberto Romero
Chief, Perinatology Research Branch
Program Director of Obstetrics and Perinatology
Intramural Division, NICHD, NIH, DHHS

"Identification of Fetal and Maternal Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Candidate Genes That Predispose to Spontaneous Preterm labor with Intact Membranes"

For a copy of the study or more information contact:

Robert Bock
Public Information and Communications Branch
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
301-496-5134

 

Dr. Roberto Romero on camera Dr. Robert Romero: We have a large body of evidence that proves that silent infections are a frequent and important cause of premature labor. These infections can also attack the fetus before it is born. Individual variations in the genes controlling inflammation in the mother and fetus may account for why premature labor occurs in some cases and not in others.
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Dr. Romero on camera Dr. Romero: We discovered that there is a genetic predisposition for premature labor, which is due to both the maternal and the fetal genome. In other words, the genetic makeup of both mother and fetus can contribute to the risk of premature labor.
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Dr. Romero on camera Dr. Romero: Our discovery is important because it helps to explain why some mothers have premature labor and delivery despite having optimal prenatal care. Some women and fetuses carry gene variants that predispose to the early onset of labor.
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Dr. Romero on camera Dr. Romero: One of every three premature babies is born to a mother with intraamniotic infection, but these infections are silent, meaning the mothers do not have a fever or other typical signs of infection.
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Dr. Romero on camera Dr. Romero: The mother initiates the onset of labor to get rid of the infected tissue. The fetus exits a hostile intrauterine environment that threatens its survival.
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Dr. Romero on camera

Dr. Romero: We studied patients from Chile, approximately 220 mothers and babies with premature labor and approximately 600 mothers and babies who had a normal pregnancy.

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Last Updated Date: 02/19/2010
Last Reviewed Date: 02/19/2010
Vision National Institutes of Health Home BOND National Institues of Health Home Home Storz Lab: Section on Environmental Gene Regulation Home Machner Lab: Unit on Microbial Pathogenesis Home Division of Intramural Population Health Research Home Bonifacino Lab: Section on Intracellular Protein Trafficking Home Lilly Lab: Section on Gamete Development Home Lippincott-Schwartz Lab: Section on Organelle Biology