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12/17/2014

Chronic high blood sugar may be detrimental to the developing brain of young children
Young children who have long-term high blood sugar levels are more likely to have slower brain growth, according to researchers at centers including the National Institutes of Health.

12/2/2014

NICHD and HSC Foundation Event on Military-Connected Children with Special Needs
Military families, researchers, and others came together at a conference to share knowledge about military-connected children with special health care needs.

12/1/2014

Nearly 55 percent of U.S. infants sleep with potentially unsafe bedding
Nearly 55 percent of U.S. infants are placed to sleep with bedding that increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, despite recommendations against the practice, report researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other institutions.

11/24/2014

Brain abnormality found in group of SIDS cases
More than 40 percent of infants in a group who died of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) were found to have an abnormality in a key part of the brain, researchers report. The abnormality affects the hippocampus, a brain area that influences such functions as breathing, heart rate, and body temperature, via its neurological connections to the brainstem. According to the researchers, supported by the National Institutes of Health, the abnormality was present more often in infants who died of SIDS than in infants whose deaths could be attributed to known causes.

11/17/2014

NICHD Funds Research on Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
TBIs can lead to years of health problems. Read this Q&A with NICHD’s Dr. Mary Ellen Michel to find out how research aims to help people recover from these injuries.

11/7/2014

Inflammation in womb affects brain, behavior of baby mice
When researchers triggered an immune response in the wombs of pregnant mice, their offspring showed signs of brain damage that lasted well into adulthood. The animal’s hippocampus—that’s the part of the brain responsible for memory and spatial orientation—was smaller, and they had poor motor skills and behavioral issues, like hyperactivity.

11/6/2014

Parents’ Response to Baby’s Babbling Can Speed Language Development
A new study suggests that how parents respond to their infants’ babbling sounds may foster their infants’ language skills. Playfully mimicking or returning infant babbling lets the child know that he or she can communicate, and this knowledge helps the infant learn the complex sounds that make up speech.

11/3/2014

A Look Inside the Brain
The NICHD supports and conducts research on concussions and other traumatic brain injuries as part of its research portfolio on brain development and rehabilitation.

10/29/2014

Researchers Use Brain Scans to Predict Early Reading Difficulties
Researchers have used brain scans to track how young children learn to read, raising the possibility that the method could be used to diagnose young children with dyslexia and other reading disorders before they experience problems in school. Once identified, the children could be fast-tracked to interventions designed to help them overcome their reading difficulties.

10/13/2014

NICHD Blogs about Safe Infant Sleep on Parents.com
Dr. Shavon Artis shares public health information and personal stories from parents to help infants sleep safely.

9/29/2014

Exploring Factors That Influence Child Development
The NICHD’s Section on Child and Family Research investigates the effects of biology, family, environment, and culture on growing children.

8/28/2014

Scientists plug into a learning brain
Learning is easier when it only requires nerve cells to rearrange existing patterns of activity than when the nerve cells have to generate new patterns, a study of monkeys has found. The scientists explored the brain’s capacity to learn through recordings of electrical activity of brain cell networks. The study was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health.

8/4/2014

NIH scientists visualize structures of brain receptors using subcellular imaging
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have created high-resolution images of the glutamate receptor, a protein that plays a key role in nerve signaling. The advance, published online in the journal Nature on August 3, 2014, opens a new window to study protein interactions in cell membranes in exquisite detail.

8/4/2014

Study Could Lead to New Therapies for Epilepsy, Depression
A new study has succeeded in creating detailed images of one group of receptors—the glutamate receptors—and this discovery may lead to therapies for these and other diseases and conditions.

3/31/2014

NICHD video highlights locusts’ contribution to understanding the nervous system
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health are uncovering clues on how the brain and nervous system functions—from an unlikely source. NICHD neuroscientist Mark A. Stopher, Ph.D., studies locusts and other insects to gain insights into the workings of the human nervous system. Dr. Stopfer is an investigator in the NICHD’s Unit on Sensory Coding and Neural Ensembles.

3/18/2014

The Family Life Project Releases Synthesis of Early Findings
A new publication provides the first 3 years of results from the NICHD’s Family Life Project. The project’s purpose is to shed light on childhood development in rural areas, with a focus on understanding how poverty and the family affect children’s development in such settings.

2/10/2014

Solving a Puzzle in the Brain
An often unsung contributor to scientific advances is the junior researcher—whether a recent college graduate or even a high school student. Recently, a group of these scientists at the NICHD laid the groundwork for the discovery of a new type of cell in the brain.

1/22/2014

40 Years of Research from Liver to Brain
Dr. Kuo-Ping (K.P.) Huang found the NICHD to be such an ideal place to do research when he arrived in 1973 that he stayed for more than 40 years. In that time, he made major discoveries related to the regulation of sugar storage and brain function. To mark his January 2014 retirement, the NICHD takes a look back at his prolific career.

12/23/2013

Revised autism screening tool offers more precise assessment
An updated screening tool that physicians administer to parents to help determine if a very young child has autism has been shown to be much more accurate than earlier versions at identifying children who could benefit from further evaluation, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health.

11/12/2013

Picture This: NICHD Support for Neuroscience Research
This week, thousands of neuroscientists from around the world—many of them supported by the NICHD and other NIH Institutes and Centers—are gathering at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. This Spotlight highlights the diverse areas of neuroscience research that the NICHD supports.
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Backgrounders

For details and further information on select NICHD News Releases, please see Backgrounders.

Vision National Institutes of Health Home BOND National Institues of Health Home Home Storz Lab: Section on Environmental Gene Regulation Home Machner Lab: Unit on Microbial Pathogenesis Home Division of Intramural Population Health Research Home Bonifacino Lab: Section on Intracellular Protein Trafficking Home Lilly Lab: Section on Gamete Development Home Lippincott-Schwartz Lab: Section on Organelle Biology