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How many women are affected/at risk?

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How many women are affected by vaginitis?

Most women will have vaginitis at some point in their lives.1 In the United States

  • About 30% of women of childbearing age have bacterial vaginosis (BV).2
  • Nearly 75% of all adult women have had at least one yeast infection in their lifetime.3
  • About 3% of women of childbearing age have trichomoniasis.4

Many women with vaginal infections have no symptoms. For instance, only 16% of women with BV report vaginal symptoms.2 For every 100 women who do have symptoms such as pain, itching, and discharge5

  • 40 to 45 women have BV.
  • 20 to 25 women have a yeast infection.
  • 15 to 20 women have trichomoniasis.

Who gets vaginitis and who is at risk?

Vaginitis affects women of all ages, races, and backgrounds. Some factors may increase a woman's risk of getting certain types of vaginitis.

  • A woman's risk of getting BV is higher if6
    • She has a new sex partner.
    • She has more than one sex partner.
    • She douches.
  • A woman's risk of getting a yeast infection is higher if7
    • She is pregnant.
    • She has diabetes that is not controlled.
    • She uses oral birth control ("the pill").
    • She douches or uses vaginal sprays.
    • She uses certain antibiotics or steroid medicines.
    • She has a weakened immune system, such as from HIV.
  • A woman's risk of getting trichomoniasis is higher if1
    • She has a new sex partner.
    • She has more than one sex partner.
    • She has a history of sexually transmitted diseases.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, 2010. Retrieved March 23, 2012, from http://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/2010/default.htm [top]
  2. Koumans, E. H., Sternberg, M., Bruce, C., McQuillan, G., Kendrick, J., Sutton, M., et al. (2007). The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in the United States, 2001–2004: Associations with symptoms, sexual behaviors, and reproductive health. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 34, 864–869. Retrieved May 23, 2012, from http://journals.lww.com/stdjournal/Fulltext/2007/11000/The_Prevalence_of_Bacterial_Vaginosis_in_the.6.aspx External Web Site Policy [top]
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012). Genital/vulvovaginal candidiasis statistics. Retrieved March 27, 2012, from http://www.cdc.gov/fungal/candidiasis/genital/statistics.html [top]
  4. Sutton, M., Sternberg, M., Koumans, E. H., McQuillan, G., Berman, S., & Markowitz, L. (2007). The prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis infection among reproductive-age women in the United States, 2001–2004. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 45, 1319–1326. Retrieved May 23, 2012, from http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/45/10/1319.full External Web Site Policy [top]
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Self-study STD module—vaginitis. Retrieved March 23, 2012, from http://www2a.cdc.gov/stdtraining/self-study/vaginitis.asp [top]
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Bacterial vaginosis—CDC fact sheet. Retrieved March 23, 2012, from http://www.cdc.gov/std/bv/stdfact-bacterial-vaginosis.htm [top]
  7. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2008). Vaginal yeast infection. Retrieved March 23, 2012, from http://www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/vaginalyeast/pages/default.aspx [top]

Last Updated Date: 11/30/2012
Last Reviewed Date: 11/30/2012
Vision National Institutes of Health Home BOND National Institues of Health Home Home Storz Lab: Section on Environmental Gene Regulation Home Machner Lab: Unit on Microbial Pathogenesis Home Division of Intramural Population Health Research Home Bonifacino Lab: Section on Intracellular Protein Trafficking Home Lilly Lab: Section on Gamete Development Home Lippincott-Schwartz Lab: Section on Organelle Biology