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Can alternative therapies treat my pain?

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Some women choose to try alternative medicine to treat their pain.1 Few research studies look at how well these treatments work to relieve pelvic pain, but alternative treatments may help in some cases. For instance, the following approaches may help relieve menstrual pain2:

  • Vitamin B1 or magnesium supplements
  • Acupuncture, acupressure, and nerve stimulation therapies
If you are thinking about trying an alternative product or therapy to cope with your pain, make sure to talk to your health care providers first. Ask them what the scientific evidence indicates about the safety of the product or therapy and how well it works.1 Keep in mind that dietary supplements can interact with other medicines you might be using or can cause problems if not used correctly.3
  1. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. (2011). Chronic pain and CAM: At a glance. Retrieved May 10, 2012, from http://nccam.nih.gov/health/pain/chronic.htm [top]
  2. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2004). ACOG practice bulletin no. 51. Chronic pelvic pain. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 103, 589–605. [top]
  3. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. (2012). Time to talk about dietary supplements: 5 things consumers need to know. Retrieved May 10, 2012, from http://nccam.nih.gov/health/tips/supplements [top]

Last Updated Date: 11/30/2012
Last Reviewed Date: 04/12/2013
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